Tag Archives: productivity

Switching from Google Inbox to Gmail – Comparison of features and tips

After releasing Inbox in May 2015, the free supplement to Google’s primary email service, Gmail, was taken offline in April 2019. Luckily, many of the popular features found in Inbox have been integrated into Gmail, so users can still enjoy the increased productivity promoted by many of Inbox’s helpful functions. In this article, we’ll consider several Inbox features and look at how we can recreate them in Gmail.

Management, leadership, collaboration, innovation. Book recommendations – part two

Martin Seibert often reads books that relate to his professional interests, which he also happens to share with many friends, colleagues, and customers. So rather than keeping this to himself, he has now started a series of blog posts where he provides short reviews of interesting (or not so interesting) books. They could prove helpful for others – a must-read tip or a lucky escape as each book receives a stamp of recommendation or is relegated to the trashcan. Here’s part two.

Management, leadership, collaboration, innovation. Book recommendations – part one

Martin Seibert often found himself thinking the books he was listening to as audiobooks could also be helpful for his colleagues or clients. So now he has started a series of blog posts where he provides short reviews of interesting (or not so interesting) books. They receive a stamp of recommendation or are relegated to the trashcan. Here’s part one.

Meetings as a last resort: Asynchronous communication with Atlassian Confluence and Jira

While meetings can be useful to come up with new ideas and alternatives, most meetings are very productive at all, and they tend to eat up employee’s valuable time. Here I make a case to reducing meetings to an absolute minimum and cultivating a culture of considerate asynchronous communication instead.

Three Pillars of Successful Product Innovation

At //SEIBERT/MEDIA, we’ve been developing and creating software for years. During this time, we’ve discovered some basic elements that are vital to building products that gain wider marketplace acceptance and are, ideally, exciting.

When I hear about dissatisfied customers or projects that failed, it’s usually because we’ve neglected to consider at least one of the following “three pillars of successful product innovation.” I now regard them as essential to our success as a product provider.